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With so many personal mobile devices in the workplace, there may come a day when computers and physical telephones are considered obsolete and replaced outright.

But, according to Nemertes Research Group vice president and service director Irwin Lazar, that time has yet to come. While smartphone and tablet appearances have exploded in the workplace, there is still enough desire for desktop interfaces that their removal from offices would cause a stir. Unified communications initiatives may be redefining enterprises, but their success will depend heavily on being able to straddle the line between legacy methodology and modern convenience.

Businesses should absolutely begin seeking out UC solutions for their communications infrastructure. But what will be crucial is providing a gradual transition to newer practices. Integration of new tools with existing telecom and employee preferences will be a common thread of successful UC deployments moving forward.

Building A Social Workplace
One of the other major technological trends that has grown alongside the personal device is social media. It is safe to assume that a vast number of employees in the workforce use social media in some form or another, be it Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. Although these services have been viewed previously by organizations as time wasters that need to be blocked on company browsers, there is much that can be learned from their execution.

According to TechTarget contributor Gina Narcisi, unified collaboration and communication can be inhibited by forcing users to move clumsily between “siloed applications.” It is essential not only to tie these services and platforms together, but also to make sure that the hardware and software in question can make good on its promise to foster productivity. Frost & Sullivan senior analyst Rob Arnold said that an online social environment has to be a part of how people are enabled to work now that is engrained so finely in the culture.

Taking The Office Elsewhere
Given that tablets and smartphones are so frequently included in UC strategies, it almost feels like the phrase “mobile unified communications” is becoming sort of redundant. According to a study conducted by Nemertes, 2014 will see an 80 percent increase in enterprises with mobile UC capabilities. But like Lazar said, a balance will have to be struck that moves the company forward while still utilizing familiar aspects of telecom.

One such way to do this is to invest in docking stations that allow mobile devices to function as traditional hardphones. Solutions like these, such as the ShoreTel Dock, allow staff members to use tools they are still accustomed to while also embracing the future.

http://www.web247.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/ShoreTel_BlogLogo.pnghttp://www.web247.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/ShoreTel_BlogLogo-150x134.pngprologTechnologyGina Narcisi,Nemertes Research Group,Rob Arnold,UC
With so many personal mobile devices in the workplace, there may come a day when computers and physical telephones are considered obsolete and replaced outright. But, according to Nemertes Research Group vice president and service director Irwin Lazar, that time has yet to come. While smartphone and tablet appearances have exploded in the workplace,...